Utah Becomes The Third U.S. Jurisdiction To Offer Blockchain-Based Mobile Voting

Utah Becomes The Third U.S. Jurisdiction To Offer Blockchain-Based Mobile Voting

Utah County is the latest jurisdiction in the U.S. to implement blockchain-based mobile voting in their upcoming municipal primary election in August. Tusk Philanthropies, which aims to increase voter turnout and participation in U.S. elections, has partnered with the Utah County Elections Division, Voatz, and the National Cybersecurity Center, to offer a blockchain-based mobile voting pilot to active-duty military, their eligible dependents and overseas voters.

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There is a lot of confusion over voting machine security, paper ballots, Russian hacking, yada yada yada. What the general public doesn’t realize is that the voting machines were designed to be hackable. No audit trail, no security. Diebold used an unsecured Access .mdb to tally the votes, which was uncovered by Bev Harris (Black Box Voting) in 2004. Google “Diebold 2004 election Ohio” for more details. Diebold was acquired by ES&S, who today count 80% of the votes. What is different about the voting machines of today versus those of 2004? When it comes to security, nothing. Why don’t more people understand that the technology does not exist and can never exist to secure the current crop of voting machines? Diebold knew this, every database developer on the planet knew this from the community–it was certainly never part of the official documentation that the feature named “Security” was an oxymoron. Crank up wikipedia again and read up on US v. Microsoft with attention to Judge Penfield Jackson’s post-settlement comments. Revisit the timeline of voting machine frauds and scandals, and you’ll probably come to the same conclusion I did. Open source and blockchain are our only hope for saving democracy, and even now it might be too late.

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