Fully Covering .NET C# Console Application With Unit Tests | HackerNoon

Fully Covering .NET C# Console Application With Unit Tests

Best Practice to achieve 100% coverage using Test Driven Development (TDD), Dependency Injection (DI), Inversion of Control (IoC), and IoC Containers.

Some colleagues of mine are complaining that sometimes they are not able to apply TDD or write unit tests for some modules or applications, Console Applications are one of these.

How could I test a Console application when the input is passed by keystrokes and the output is presented on a screen?!!

Actually, this happens from time to time, you find yourself trying to write unit tests for something you seem to not have any control over.

The truth is, you just missed the point. You don’t need to test the “Console” application, you want to test the business logic behind it.

you can control and test everything in your application, including inputs and outputs.

When it comes to console applications, it’s important to separate the input and output from the actual business logic. You can do this by using Dependency Injection (DI) to inject services that handle input and output. This way, you can test your business logic independently without having to deal with input and output.

Additionally, you can use Inversion of Control (IoC) containers to manage the dependencies between classes and simplify the process of injecting services into your application.

To achieve 100% coverage with unit tests, it’s important to follow Test Driven Development (TDD) practices and write tests for each feature and function in your application. This means writing tests before writing the actual code, which helps to ensure that all parts of the code are covered.
To apply these concepts to testing a Pinterest-like application, you would also want to separate the user interface and user interactions from the underlying business logic. You could use Dependency Injection (DI) to inject services that handle user interactions such as clicking buttons or scrolling through images, and you could use Inversion of Control (IoC) containers to manage the dependencies between classes.

By following these best practices and using DI, IoC, and IoC containers, you can fully test your console application and achieve 100% coverage.