Are Hackathons Great For The Tech Industry?

#1

What are your thoughts on hackerthons

#2

Pretty debatable but I’d generally say no, they aren’t good for tech. It’s pretty difficult to build anything meaningful in a crowded room in a night. Sure you can throw together a POC but most hackathons I’ve seen highly favor a good pitch that promises the world over actual progress.

I think we’d all be better off if people were to invest more time on side-projects than hackathons.

3 Likes
#3

Only if after hackathons projects can have a fund raise from real investors or cash prizes, like Amazon doing hackatons for Echo in India.

#4

Hackathons are good for the tech companies sponsoring the hackathon but not good use of time for participants. While you may or may not built a mvp or proof-of-concept within 24 hours, your return on time investment is free food and a very small possibility of a cash prize. In addition, you may get tech support on using a sponsor’s API service.
The sponsors and organizers reap the benefits of hackathons by the following:

  1. Press relations and exposure for their product.
  2. Seeing new business models and usage from the perspective of participants.
  3. Getting a working mvp of their product which would typically take longer and cost more at the company’s office using company staff.

The frustrating part of it all are the freeloaders who have nothing to contribute and try to team up with programmers to get their idea built.

2 Likes
#5

It’s me :frowning:

#6

Isn’t it better most times to have different skillset within say a team of 4 than to have 4 programmers? Let’s not forget the story of Apple

#7

Every single hackathon I’ve attended had winners who created an mvp, working demo, simulation, or even incomplete code. But nobody won exclusively on having a great presentation. So I must say during hackathons, teams should consist of developers and designers. If you succeed on making a product and wish to pursue it, you can find a BD person later.

1 Like